These Case Study pages showcase examples of good practice in minerals restoration which is benefiting the natural environment and people.

All
  • All
  • Birds
  • Upland birds
  • Wetland birds
  • Wildfowl and waders
  • Mammals
  • Otter
  • White clawed crayfish
  • Invertebrates

Whitesands Quarry

Whitesands Quarry is a 100ha site situated to the south-east of the town of Dunbar, East Lothian. Recognising the potential for the site to deliver for biodiversity and, in particular, wintering wildfowl and wader populations, Lafarge Tarmac and RSPB Scotland entered into an agreement to undertake an in-depth feasibility study, to explore different habitat creation options at the site.

Weatherhill Quarry

Weatherhill Quarry is a 116h silica sand quarry situated within the North Pennines SAC / SPA. Following the cessation of extraction works, the operator is obliged to submit a reclamation scheme for the site. Given the sensitive location of the site, Nature After Minerals was asked to provide advice for a restoration scheme that maximises biodiversity, while also extending the internationally-important habitats in the surrounding designated land.

Paxton Pits Nature Reserve

Gravel was extracted around Little Paxton between the 1940s and the early 1960s, resulting in a series of flooded pits. There were no plans to restore these for nature conservation, but later operators allowed natural regeneration to occur and by 1980 Paxton Pits had developed considerable wildlife interest, in particular for birds.

Panshanger Quarry

Panshanger Park and the River Mimram that flows through it are part of a Grade II* listed historic landscape. Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown was appointed to carry out the original landscaping in 1756, followed by Humphrey Repton into the early 19th century. During World War II much of the park was ploughed and planted for arable use.

Needingworth Quarry

Needingworth Quarry is one of the largest sand and gravel extraction sites in the UK. Extraction is expected to span over 30 years, during which time 28 million tonnes of sand and gravel will be removed. It covers an area of approximately 975 ha adjacent to the Great Ouse River.

Middleton Lakes

The Middleton Lakes complex is located approximately 1.5km south west of Tamworth, within the River Tame valley. Principally in Staffordshire, part of the site crosses into the neighbouring county of Warwickshire.

Langford Lowfields

Langford Lowfields is adjacent to the River Trent approximately 5km north of Newark. It is one of four active sand, gravel and sandstone quarries currently operated by Tarmac in Nottinghamshire.

Cassington Quarry

Cassington lies adjacent to the A40 in the Thames Valley approximately 4km north-west of Oxford city centre. The site is an extension to 70 hectares of existing traditional open water restorations that are used for fishing but with no general public access. The site lies within 500 metres of two wet meadow SSSI’s (Cassington Meadows and Pixey & Yarnton Meads).